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Hay (Amy Carpenter), Oral History Interview: Home

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Interview Information:

Two interview sessions: 4 February 2015, 2 June 2015
Approximate total duration: 4 hours

Interviewer: Tacey A. Rosolowski, Ph.D.

 

For supplementary materials:

Please contact, the Historical Resources Center, Research Medical Library:
Javier Garza, MSIS, jjgarza@mdanderson.org

 

About the Interview Subject:

Amy Carpenter Hay (b. 16 September 1973, Dallas, Texas) came to MD Anderson in 1996 as a Patient Service Coordinator.  Since 2012 she has served as Vice President of Business Development.

She rose through administrative levels in Radiation Oncology.  As Director of Radiation Oncology (2001 – 2005) she developed the first MD Anderson satellite care center and assisted in the development of MD Anderson’s Proton Therapy Center.  She left MD Anderson to serve as Administrator and CEO Proton Therapy Center (2005 – 2007) and principle of ProBeam Oncology, returning as Division Administrator for the Division of Radiation Oncology (2007 – 2008) to develop the Regional Care System.  In 2008 Ms. Hay became Head of Global Business Development, advancing to Vice President of Business Development in 2012.

Major Topics Covered:

Personal and educational background

Evolution of the satellite/regional care system

The development of the Proton Therapy Center

The Center for Global Oncology

The Office of Global Business Development

Business partnerships in the United States and abroad

Financial challenges to MD Anderson and healthcare

Visualizing business opportunity in healthcare

Technology and business opportunity

Women and leadership

Shifts in MD Anderson research and culture to innovation and technology

 

Regarding the Transcript and Audio Files

In accordance with oral history best practices, this transcript was intentionally created to preserve the conversational language of the interview sessions.  (Language has not been edited to conform to written prose).

The interview subject was given the opportunity to review the transcript.  Any requested editorial changes are indicated in brackets [ ], and the audio file has not correspondingly altered. 

Redactions to the transcript and audio files may have been made in response to the interview subject’s request or to eliminate personal health information in compliance with HIPAA.


 

Table of Contents

 

Interview Session One: 4 February 2015

 

An Early Interest in Health Care
Chapter 01 / Educational Path

 

A New Role at MD Anderson Reflects Changes in Health Care
Chapter 02 / Institutional Change

  

Learning the Complexities of Institutions; Balancing the Goals of Administrators and Physician-Leaders at MD Anderson
Chapter 03 / Overview

  

Planning the Proton Therapy Center
Chapter 04 / Building the Institution
 

 

Establishing the First Satellite Center: “A Great Business and Clinical Story”
Chapter 05 / Building the Institution

  

A New Role as CEO of the Proton Therapy Center; Lessons in Effective Leadership
Chapter 06 / Professional Path

  

Global Institutional Partnerships
Chapter 07 / Beyond the Institution
 

 

Adapting a Consulting Business to MD Anderson Needs
Chapter 08 / Building the Institution

  

The Office of Global Business Development: A First Partnership in Banner, Arizona
Chapter 09 / Building the Institution

 

Strategic Expansion and Partnerships
Chapter 10 / Building the Institution

 

Interview Session Two: 2 June 2015

 

The Center for Global Oncology: Background and Operations
Chapter 11 / Building the Institution

 

The Center for Global Oncology Becomes the MD Anderson Cancer Network, Part I
Chapter 12 / Building the Institution

  

Dr. Ronald DePinho and Institutional Change
Chapter 13 / Institutional Change
 

 

Planning for the Next Growth Areas
Chapter 14 / Building the Institution

 

The Center for Global Oncology Becomes the MD Anderson Cancer Network, Part II
Chapter 15 / Building the Institution

  

As VP of Business Development: Today’s Initiatives and What the Future Holds for MD Anderson
Chapter 16 / Building the Institution
 

 

Personal Sacrifice, Women, and Leadership at MD Anderson
Chapter 17 / Diversity Issues

  

Resilience in Leadership and a Presidency Defined by Innovation
Chapter 18 / Institutional Change

 


Chapter Summaries

 

 

Interview Session One: 4 February 2015 (listen/read)

 

Chapter 00A
Interview Identifier (listen/read)

 

Chapter 01 (Educational Path)
An Early Interest in Health Care (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • Character, Values, Beliefs, Talents
  • Personal Background
  • Professional Path
  • Inspirations to Practice Science/Medicine
  • Influences from People and Life Experiences

In this chapter, Ms. Hay speaks briefly about her family background then explains that she elected to go to Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas (B.A. conferred in 1996) because she was looking for a broad education.  She lists her varied interests in college and notes that she was thinking of becoming a physician, but discovered she was better suited to a career in finance.  She notes that she was always interested in health care and wanted not just a job, but a career focused on helping people.  She describes characteristics she has inherited from various family members.

 

Chapter 02 (Institutional Change)
A New Role at MD Anderson Reflects Changes in Health Care (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • Joining MD Anderson
  • Professional Path
  • Overview
  • Definitions, Explanations, Translations
  • Patients
  • Cancer and Disease
  • This is MD Anderson
  • Evolution of Career
  • Leadership
  • Mentoring
  • The History of Health Care, Patient Care
  • Research, Care, and Education
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • Growth and/or Change
  • Institutional Processes

Ms. Hay begins this chapter by explaining that she came to Houston in 1996 because of her fiancé’s job and then began searching for a job in health care.  She wanted to work for MD Anderson and describes the advantages of working for an institution with a single mission.  She explains that MD Anderson was hiring college graduates to serve as Patient Service Coordinators (PSC).  She explains the reasons why this role was being transformed and also recalls the period of change under John Mendelsohn [Oral History Interview] (who assumed presidency of the institution in ’96).  She was hired to serve as PSC in the Department of Radiation Oncology.  She explains why the job was difficult and her strategy of never saying ‘No, it’s not my job’ in order to advance.  She describes her responsibilities as a PSC, noting that her early negotiation skills came from this period.

 

Chapter 03 (Overview)
Learning the Complexities of Institutions; Balancing the Goals of Administrators and Physician-Leaders at MD Anderson (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • Professional Path
  • The Administrator
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • Understanding the Institution
  • On the Nature of Institutions
  • Leadership

In this chapter, Ms. Hay first reflects on how her role as a Patient Services Coordinator benefited her career.  She developed a commitment to fixing the complexities and difficulties of institutions, prompting her to earn a Masters of Science in Healthcare Administration at Houston Baptist University (conferred 1999).  She explains that she was awarded an Administrative Fellowship in 1999 and talks about the opportunities this afforded.

Ms. Hay characterizes MD Anderson as a physician-led organization.  She compares administrators to physician leaders, noting the need for true partnership between the two groups/perspectives to make an institution work.  Business goals must be adapted to the goals of clinicians and basic researchers, she explains, rather than overlaying business goals over their activities.  She notes that MD Anderson can advance and grow because the institution has figured out the right balance in this leadership.

 

Chapter 04 (Building the Institution)
Planning the Proton Therapy Center (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • MD Anderson History
  • Devices, Drugs, Procedures
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • Institutional Mission and Values
  • The Administrator
  • Patients, Treatment, Survivors
  • Beyond the Institution
  • The Institution and Finances
  • Research, Care, and Education
  • Technology and R&D

Ms. Hay explains the mission areas that Dr. James Cox [Oral History Interview] assigned her when she joined Radiation Oncology, then focuses on her work developing a Proton Therapy Center.

She tells the story of securing financial backing, eventually involving a boutique investment company, Sanders Morris Harris Group.  She explains the advantages of securing local and “patient money” [meaning investors that could patiently wait for returns].  She tells about working with Hitachi o provide equipment. 

Ms. Hay then sketches the history of the institution’s interest in proton therapy.  She talks about the advantages of the LLC status of the Proton Therapy Center.

She explains why research demonstrating clinical efficiency of proton therapy was lacking.  She talks about the use of proton therapy in treating different cancers and the effect on the quality of life.

 

Chapter 05 (Building the Institution)
Establishing the First Satellite Center: “A Great Business and Clinical Story” (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Institutional Processes
  • MD Anderson History
  • Institutional Mission and Values
  • Growth and/or Change
  • Patients, Treatment, Survivors
  • Character, Values, Beliefs, Talents
  • The MD Anderson Brand, Reputation
  • Beyond the Institution
  • MD Anderson in the Future
  • Discovery and Success
  • The Institution and Finances

Ms. Hay notes that the story of the Radiation Oncology Center in Bellaire, Texas, is ‘a great business and clinical story’ that led to the creation of the entire satellite system. 

She tells the story of setting up a health center in Bellaire, Texas.  She explains why this was bold and controversial move. She talks about the negotiations with General Electric (which owned the note on the Center) and describes how the Center was opened, with immediate positive responses from patients.  She describes the involvement of the Physicians’ Network. 

Next, Ms. Hay explains that the Bellaire site was the beginning of the entire satellite system and the expansion that was part of John Mendelsohn’s [Oral History Interview] vision for the institution. 

Ms. Hay talks about the selection of partners and factors that lead to the success of the satellite locations, including MD Anderson’s willingness to terminate ineffective partnerships.

She reviews the growth of the use of satellite centers and stresses how important they are for the future of MD Anderson.

 

Chapter 06 (Professional Path)
A New Role as CEO of the Proton Therapy Center; Lessons in Effective Leadership (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • Professional Path
  • The Administrator
  • Institutional Processes
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • This is MD Anderson
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • Entrepreneur, Biotechnology

Ms. Hay talks her work after 2005, when she asked to leave MD Anderson to take a role as CEO of the Proton Therapy Center.  She talks about the change in role and environment, where she had to bring a new focus to finances in addition to clinical care. 

She explains Dr. Cox’s approach of developing a clientele for the Proton Therapy Center.  She talks about the lessons she learned through this process, notably the importance of accountability.  She talks about how effective leadership finds ways of engaging clinicians in ways that are meaningful to them.

Ms. Hay then explains that the Proton Therapy Center offers an excellent example of multi-disciplinary care that breaks down barriers between disciplines and institutions. She emphasizes that this approach is crucial to MD Anderson’s future and will help the institution “leverage everything we do.”

 

Chapter 07 (Beyond the Institution)
Global Institutional Partnerships (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • Professional Path
  • The Administrator
  • Institutional Processes
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • This is MD Anderson
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • Entrepreneurs, Biotechnology
  • Beyond the Institution
  • Global Issues –Cancer, Health, Medicine

In this chapter, Ms. Hay talks about her role in the development of opportunities for global partnerships, beginning with the American Hospital in Istanbul, Turkey in 2006, where there was no oncology program.  She talks about building a basis for MD Anderson quality abroad and traces issues involved in opening the co-branded facility ion 2010.  She notes that it “works seamlessly” and that plans are underway to expand this relationship so it can operate as a regional center.

 

Chapter 08 (Building the Institution)
Adapting a Consulting Business to MD Anderson Needs 
(listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Multi-disciplinary Approaches
  • Growth and/or Change
  • Activities Outside Institution
  • Beyond the Institution
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • The MD Anderson Brand, Reputation
  • Entrepreneurs, Biotechnology

Ms. Hay begins this chapter by explaining that when she was CEO of the Proton Therapy Center, she became interested in international consulting and set up a company, ProBeam, with some partners.

She then talks about her decision to come back to MD Anderson as Assistant Vice President of Global Business Development , a move that resulted in ProBeam being integrated into MD Anderson and a focus on international and national business opportunities.  She talks about refining the mission of the consulting initiative and explains work with a client, Albert Einstein Hospital, in Brazil.

 

Chapter 09 (Building the Institution)
The Office of Global Business Development: A First Partnership in Banner, Arizona (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • The Administrator
  • Institutional Processes
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Leadership
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • Entrepreneurs, Biotechnology
  • Beyond the Institution
  • Global Issues –Cancer, Health, Medicine

In this chapter, Ms. Hay talks about her role in administering the negotiations and implementation process that resulted in a co-branded partnership with MD Anderson Banner, Arizona.  She explains the process of reviewing the cancer center and lists the challenges of overcoming institutional differences that could prevent a full offering of MD Anderson quality care.  She describes how these challenges resulting led to the service growing the service piece-by-piece, by subspecialities.   She notes that MD Anderson required that Banner employ their physicians to take financial interest out of the equation of providing cancer care.  She explains why this was a challenge and how it was resolved.  She explains how the program came together to form a solid partnership.

 

Chapter 10 (Building the Institution)
Strategic Expansion and Partnerships 
(listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • The Administrator
  • Institutional Processes
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Growth and/or Change
  • Leadership
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • Entrepreneurs, Biotechnology
  • Beyond the Institution
  • Global Issues –Cancer, Health, Medicine

In this chapter, Ms. Hay discusses how, in 2011/2012, MD Anderson hired Price Waterhouse Cooper to evaluate possibilities for strategic expansion.  She notes that this represents a big shift in paradigm for the institution under Dr. DePinho –a move to expand very aggressively.  She explains that this happened in concert with the formation of the MD Anderson Cancer Network.  She talks about the two categories of partnership that can be formed and notes that MD Anderson will seek to establish four to six co-branded partnerships in the next ten years.  A partnership is evolving in Cooper, New Jersey.

 

 

Interview Session Two: 2 June 2015 (listen/read)

 

Chapter 00B
Interview Identifier (listen/read)

 

Chapter 11 (Building the Institution)
The Center for Global Oncology: Background and Operations (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • Overview
  • Entrepreneurs, Biotechnology
  • The Administrator
  • Institutional Mission and Values
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • The MD Anderson Brand, Reputation
  • MD Anderson History
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Multi-disciplinary Approaches
  • Growth and/or Change
  • Business of Research
  • Fiscal Realities in Healthcare
  • Professional Path
  • Leadership

Ms. Hay provides an overview of the formation and operation of the Center for Global Oncology.  She served as Associate Vice President of Global Business Development, one arm of service in the Center.

She begins by explaining that healthcare institutions nationwide were seeking partnerships when the decision was made to form the Center in 2008.  She the talks about how the institutions contacted MD Anderson, how their needs were assessed, and how she partnered with Oliver Bogler, in Global Academic Programs, to satisfy those needs.

She sketches her main role, to identify and negotiate legal contracts with partner institutions, and provides examples, including consideration of financial gain for MD Anderson. 

Ms. Hay also sketches the challenges involved in bringing institutional (and national) cultures together in multi-disciplinary care.

 

Chapter 12 (Building the Institution)
The Center for Global Oncology Becomes the MD Anderson Cancer Network, Part I (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • Entrepreneurs, Biotechnology
  • Institutional Mission and Values
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • The MD Anderson Brand, Reputation
  • MD Anderson History
  • Institutional Processes
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Multi-disciplinary Approaches
  • Growth and/or Change
  • Business of Research
  • Fiscal Realities in Healthcare

Ms. Hay explains how institutional growth has resulted in reorganization that has brought the Center for Global Oncology into the new MD Anderson Cancer Network.  The aim, she explains, has been to address the disconnect between business development and research.

She talks about the “product line” of connections with MD Anderson: partnerships, sister institutions, and certified membership. 

Ms. Hay also explains the process by which the MD Anderson Network’s significance has been clarified within MD Anderson, winning support from division heads.  Since division heads must approve physicians working in partner institutions, this facilitates expansion.

 

Chapter 13 (Institutional Change)
Dr. Ronald DePinho and Institutional Change (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • Growth and/or Change
  • Institutional Politics
  • Controversy
  • Understanding the Institution
  • On the Nature of Institutions

Ms. Hay comments on the early years of Dr. Ronald DePinho’s leadership of MD Anderson.  She notes his emphasis on the “democratization of cancer.”  In response to a question about criticisms of his approach from MD Anderson faculty, she says that the value of partnerships is now being demonstrated.  She comments on all institutional change being a difficult, particularly in medical institutions, which are traditionally conservative. 

 

Chapter 14 (Building the Institution)
Planning for the Next Growth Areas (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • MD Anderson in the Future
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Multi-disciplinary Approaches
  • Growth and/or Change
  • Research, Care, and Education
  • Institutional Mission and Values
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • The MD Anderson Brand, Reputation
  • Business of Research
  • Fiscal Realities in Healthcare
  • On Texas and Texans
  • Business of Research
  • Fiscal Realities in Healthcare
  • The Healthcare Industry

Ms. Hay explains that the Office of Business Development is looking ahead to visualize opportunities arising from research and patient care.

On the research side, she talks about big data and the opportunities to gather enormous amounts of data that can feed personalized care.

She notes that MD Anderson has created a new position: Chief Innovations Officer.

Next she talks about pursuing employers as partners, with MD Anderson supplying expertise in prevention, screening, and education.  She talks about a pilot program that will begin in about a year, and explains that there is more awareness of the practical value of prevention and employers want to offer such programs.

 

Chapter 15 (Building the Institution)
The Center for Global Oncology Becomes the MD Anderson Cancer Network, Part II
 (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • The MD Anderson Brand, Reputation
  • MD Anderson History
  • Institutional Processes
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Growth and/or Change
  • Business of Research
  • Fiscal Realities in Healthcare
  • The Healthcare Industry

Ms. Hay returns to the story of the Center for Global Oncology’s transformation into the MD Anderson Cancer Network.  She explains that this was a sign of growth and maturation and became necessary so MD Anderson could develop a clear line of products that allowed affiliation with the institution.

 

Chapter 16 (Building the Institution)
As VP of Business Development: Today’s Initiatives and What the Future Holds for MD Anderson (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • Leadership
  • MD Anderson in the Future
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Multi-disciplinary Approaches
  • Growth and/or Change
  • Research, Care, and Education
  • Institutional Mission and Values
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • The MD Anderson Brand, Reputation
  • Business of Research
  • Fiscal Realities in Healthcare
  • The Healthcare Industry
  • Technology and R&D

Ms. Hay sketches her current projects and her vision for new directions.

Her current work focuses on refining the model of how MD Anderson establishes partnerships with other institutions in the U.S. and abroad.  She talks about the need to develop payer products to address changes in the healthcare reimbursement arena.  She talks about the need to diversify MD Anderson’s income streams beyond patient care revenue and lists roles that the Office of Business Development serves as other offices take on this challenge as well.

Ms. Hay explains that in future she will focus on visioning business possibilities facilitated by technology and gives an example of discussions with Elekta about providing mobile treatment planning for radiation oncology.   

Ms. Hay notes that “we should be a cancer knowledge network” in a nation that focuses on genetic testing, molecular immunology, and the democratization of cancer care dovetail with MD Anderson goals.

 

Chapter 17 (Diversity Issues)
Personal Sacrifice, Women, and Leadership at MD Anderson (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • Dedication to MD Anderson, to Patients, to Faculty/Staff
  • The Life and Dedication of Clinicians and Researchers
  • Women and Minorities at Work
  • Experiences re: Gender, Race, Ethnicity
  • Leadership
  • Mentoring

Ms. Hay begins with comments on the personal sacrifices she has made because of her belief in the MD Anderson mission.

She then offers leadership advice and comments on the experiences of women aspiring to leadership roles at the institution.  She comments on what women in particular bring to leadership and negotiation.

 

Chapter 18 (Institutional Change)
Resilience in Leadership and a Presidency Defined by Innovation (listen/read)

 

Topics Covered

  • Leadership
  • Institutional Mission and Values
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • The MD Anderson Brand, Reputation
  • This is MD Anderson
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Multi-disciplinary Approaches
  • Growth and/or Change

Ms. Hay begins by explaining that resilience is a key quality for a leader, particularly in a physician-led institution.

She talks about the importance of innovation and strategic thinking at MD Anderson, observing that innovation may define Dr. DePinho’s legacy at MD Anderson.  She explains that she visualizes a “perfect storm” coalescing, where the institution is on the “cusp of greatness.”