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DuBois (Raymond Nelson), Jr., MD, PhD, Oral History Interview: Home

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Welcome to the interview landing page.

 

Scroll down this page to explore this interview in several ways.

An Interview Profile summarizes this individual’s role, specialization, and contributions to MD Anderson.

A Table of Contents shows the range of topics covered in each interview session: each chapter title links to a chapter summary.

Chapter Summaries describe the specific topics treated in each section; each summary links to the corresponding recording so you can listen to the chapter.

Here is a link to the full transcript so you may browse and search. (link)

 

 

Interview Profile

 

 

 

 

Interview Information:

Three sessions:  13, 14, 15 November, 2018
Interviewer: Tacey A. Rosolowski, Ph.D. 

 

About the Interview Subject:

Dr. Raymond DuBois (b. Runge, Texas) came to MD Anderson in 2007 to serve as Provost and Executive VP under Dr. John Mendelsohn.  He left the institution in 2012 and, since 2016, has Dean of the College of Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.

 

Major Topics Covered:

Personal background and education

Research:  Molecular biology, colorectal cancer, cancer interruption

The Provost’s Office at MD Anderson (2000s): plan to build research; working with faculty

Executive leadership (2000s): Executive Committee; strategic planning; response to financial crises

Institutional changes under Ronald DePinho, MD

Leadership: philosophy, leadership growth, fostering leadership; UT System’s process of selecting a new president

Academic medical centers: developing research and education

 

About transcription and the transcript

 

This interview had been transcribed according to oral history best practices to preserve the conversational quality of spoken language (rather than editing it to written standards).

The interview subject has been given the opportunity to review the transcript and make changes: any substantial departures from the audio file are indicated with brackets [ ].

In addition, the Archives may have redacted portions of the transcript and audio file in compliance with HIPAA and/or interview subject requests.

The views expressed in this interview are solely the perspective of the interview subject. They are not to be interpreted as the official view of any other individual or of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.


Table of Contents

 

Interview Session One: November 13, 2018

 

A Texas Family in a Small Town
Chapter 01 / Personal Background

 

A World of Research Opens Up at Texas A & M and UT Southwestern
Chapter 02 / Educational Path

 

Medical School with a View of How the Basic Sciences Might Address Clinical Problems
Chapter 03 / Professional Path

 

Research and Administration at Vanderbilt University, Focusing on Cancer
Chapter 04 / Professional Path

 

Thoughts on Healthcare, Academic Medical Centers and the Medical University of South Carolina
Chapter 05 / Overview

 

An Offer from MD Anderson
Chapter 06 / Joining MD Anderson/Coming to Texas

 

Provost and EVP at MD Anderson: an Overview
Chapter 07 / Building the Institution

 

 

Interview Session Two: November 14, 2018

 

On Growing as a Leader, First Impressions of MD Anderson, and a First Day on the Job
Chapter 08 / Overview

 

Building Research from the Provost’s Office
Chapter 09 / Building the Institution

 

Strategic Planning, Budgets, Physical Space, and Industry Partnerships
Chapter 10 / Building the Institution

 

Financial Processes, Challenges, and a Crisis;
Chapter 11 / Professional Path

Executive Teamwork and a Long-Range Vision for the Institution
Chapter 12 / Building the Institution

 

A Candidate for the Presidency of MD Anderson;
Chapter 13 / Professional Path

 

 

 

Interview Session Three: November 15, 2018

 

An Institution Transitions Under a New President
Chapter 14 / Building the Institution

 

Institutional Changes and the Decision to Leave MD Anderson
Chapter 15 / Institutional Change

 

New Roles at Arizona State University and the Medical University of South Carolina
Chapter 16 / Overview

 

Advances in Cancer Interruption
Chapter 17 / The Researcher

 

Final Comments on Leadership and Retirement
Chapter 18 / Overview

 


Chapter Summaries

Interview Session One: November 13, 2018 (listen/read)

 

Chapter 00A: 
Interview Identifier (listen/read)


Chapter 01  (Personal Background)
A Texas Family in a Small Town   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Character, Values, Beliefs, Talents
  • Personal Background
  • Influences from People and Life Experiences
  • Discovery and Success
  • Formative Experiences

In this chapter, Dr. DuBois talks about his family background, early education and key experiences.

He first sketches his family roots in France and Ireland, noting that the emigres eventually settled in South Texas in a farming and ranching community. He grew up in a family of modest means, with his father working in the oil fields while also sustaining a ranch. Dr. DuBois next talks about his involvement in the Future Farmers of America while in high school. He decided to raise livestock and eventually one of his steers won a local grand championship and was shown at a livestock fair in Houston. This was a key event in that it allowed him to apply for a scholarship that enabled him to attend college.

Dr. DuBois discusses what made that period of time so critical: he talks about the skills, work ethic, and “grit” he developed through that project. He notes he was also very involved in sports during high school.

Next, Dr. DuBois talks about his education in this community where there were only 80 students in the high school and few people attended college. He notes that he was a good but not spectacular student and assumed that he would go into some kind of agricultural education and teach. He talks about applying for his scholarship and some challenges using it for college.

 



Chapter 02  (Educational Path)
A World of Research Opens Up at Texas A & M and UT Southwestern   (listen/read)

Codes

  • The Researcher
  • Overview
  • Definitions, Explanations, Translations
  • Personal Background
  • Character, Values, Beliefs, Talents
  • Influences from People and Life Experiences
  • Professional Path
  • Evolution of Career
  • Inspirations to Practice Science/Medicine
  • Discovery and Success
  • Formative Experiences
  • Professional Practice
  • The Professional at Work
  • Collaborations

In this chapter, Dr. DuBois explains that when he began college at Texas A & M University, he soon realized that agricultural education was not challenging enough.1 This was reinforced when he took the opportunity to become involved in a research project with Dr. Stanley Cohen on epidermal growth factor purified from mouse salivary glands. He talks about transferring to the Biochemistry Department, where he found the faculty very supportive and where he was advised to move forward with a PhD program. He then explains why he ended up staying in Texas for his PhD program at University of Texas at Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

Dr. DuBois talks about his PhD program at UT Southwestern and his work with Michael Waterman on induction of cytochromes in the liver, leading to his dissertation work on the mechanisms by which pharmaceuticals regulated levels of cytochrome p450 in the liver. He also notes that he had the opportunity to rotate through other laboratories and participate in clinical conferences, all of which led him to decide to go to medical school.

 



Chapter 03  (Professional Path)
Medical School with a View of How the Basic Sciences Might Address Clinical Problems   (listen/read)

Codes

  • The Researcher
  • Overview
  • Definitions, Explanations, Translations
  • Discovery and Success
  • Personal Background
  • Character, Values, Beliefs, Talents
  • Influences from People and Life Experiences
  • Professional Path
  • Evolution of Career
  • Inspirations to Practice Science/Medicine
  • On Research and Researchers
  • Understanding Cancer, the History of Science, Cancer Research
  • The History of Health Care, Patient Care
  • Professional Practice
  • The Professional at Work
  • Collaborations

Dr. DuBois begins this chapter by noting that in ’79-’80 he had a vision of how basic sciences observations about drugs could be used to address clinical problems. He elected to go into gastroenterology at through his medical program at UT Health Sciences at San Antonio (MD, 1985). During the summers he conducted research in Dr. Raymond Burke’s laboratory, characterizing selenoproteins. He explains that he also had the opportunity to work with Thressa Stadtman, who discovered selenoproteins, through a fellowship program at the NIH (1983-1984). During that time he made advances to that work by identifying steps required in purifying the proteins.

Next, Dr. DuBois talks about his internship and residency at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (1985-88), where he worked with Dr. Victor McKusick, who was working on cloning all the genes affected when a cell is stimulated to grow. Dr. DuBois explains that he worked on an RNA binding protein, Nup475, a project he continued working on as a Research Associate to Daniel Nathans at the Howard Hughes Research Institute (July 1988-March 1991).

 



Chapter 04  (Professional Path)
Research and Administration at Vanderbilt University, Focusing on Cancer   (listen/read)

Codes

  • The Researcher
  • Discovery and Success
  • Overview
  • Definitions, Explanations, Translations
  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • Professional Practice
  • The Professional at Work
  • Professional Path
  • Evolution of Career
  • Understanding Cancer, the History of Science, Cancer Research
  • The History of Health Care, Patient Care

Dr. DuBois begins this chapter by explaining how he was led to take a faculty position at Vanderbilt University in 1991, and where he would stay for sixteen years.2 He first talks about how he continued his research, leading to the discovery that COX-2 played a role in cancer and that it could be inhibited. This work was published in Cell in 1993, and helped him make his name.


Next Dr. DuBois explains how he came to serve as the Research Director of the Department of Hepatology (‘93/’94), then advanced to director of the division. He explains how his perspective on the institution changed with his expanded responsibilities and notes that he completed an executive MBA program at Vanderbilt. He talks about how administration is like running a small business and training in this perspective is essential for physician leaders.

He notes that his biggest reward is seeing young faculty become successful.

 

Dr. DuBois begins this chapter by explaining how he was led to take a faculty position at Vanderbilt University in 1991, and where he would stay for sixteen years.2 He first talks about how he continued his research, leading to the discovery that COX-2 played a role in cancer and that it could be inhibited. This work was published in Cell in 1993, and helped him make his name.

Next Dr. DuBois explains how he came to serve as the Research Director of the Department of Hepatology (‘93/’94), then advanced to director of the division. He explains how his perspective on the institution changed with his expanded responsibilities and notes that he completed an executive MBA program at Vanderbilt. He talks about how administration is like running a small business and training in this perspective is essential for physician leaders.

He notes that his biggest reward is seeing young faculty become successful.

 



Chapter 05  (Overview)
Thoughts on Healthcare, Academic Medical Centers and the Medical University of South Carolina   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Overview
  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • Professional Practice
  • The Professional at Work
  • Mentoring
  • On Mentoring
  • On Research and Researchers
  • Understanding Cancer, the History of Science, Cancer Research
  • The History of Health Care, Patient Care
  • On the Nature of Institutions
  • Business of Research
  • Fiscal Realities in Healthcare
  • The Healthcare Industry

After a question about education for physician-scientists, Dr. DuBois shares some of his own experiences teaching medical students then explains how the Medical University of South Carolina (where he currently serves as Dean of the Medical College) has moved to create a flexible and integrated curriculum. He notes the institution also offers a MD/PhDs as well as combined degrees in business administration, law and other fields. He explains the “huge need” in healthcare for physicians who are good at business concepts, noting why this will be a “savior for academic medical centers. ”
 



Chapter 06  (Joining MD Anderson/Coming to Texas)
An Offer from MD Anderson   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Professional Path
  • Evolution of Career
  • Joining MD Anderson
  • Personal Background
  • Obstacles, Challenges
  • Professional Values, Ethics, Purpose
  • Critical Perspectives
  • Critical Perspectives
  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • Professional Values, Ethics, Purpose

Dr. DuBois begins this chapter by observing that administrators take two to three years to understand the ropes of their new roles, two to three years to set up processes, and another two to three years to reap the benefits of these processes.

He next talks about stepping into the role of Director of Vanderbilt University’s cancer center in 2005, because the former director was retiring and the institution wanted an internal hire. In 2006, he notes, he got a call from John Mendelsohn to talk about an opportunity to serve as Provost at MD Anderson. He explains what he learned of the situation at MD Anderson and what it might offer him. He also explains his family’s reluctance to leave Nashville.

 



Chapter 07  (Building the Institution)
Provost and EVP at MD Anderson: an Overview   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Portraits
  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Fundraising, Philanthropy, Donations, Volunteers
  • Research

In this chapter, Dr. DuBois provides an overview of the position he assumed when coming to MD Anderson in 2012. He first shares his impressions of Dr. John Mendelsohn, then president of MD Anderson, then notes that he was involved in assisting Dr. Mendelsohn secure the $150 million gift from the Khalifa Foundation of the United Arab Emirates.

Next he explains that his mandate from Dr. Mendelsohn was to develop the institution’s research to higher levels. He describes what had been set in place by the time he arrived, including Dr.Mendelsohn’s idea of the “cancer care cycle.” He explains that he focused on stimulating collaboration across the institution, getting teams to work well together, and on supporting study of patients who were unusual responders to treatment. Dr. DuBois talks about setting up his own lab on South Campus.

Next, he mentions that, when asked what MD Anderson could do to move to the cutting edge of research, he responded that immunotherapy would be a fruitful research path. He explains that he already knew Jim Allison and his work and began speaking with Dr. Allison about coming to MD Anderson. 3

Dr. DuBois then explains that he was hired into a role of Provost when the position had previously been titled, Chief Academic Officer, to send more of an academic message. He explains what the former CAO had set in place before he arrived.

 

 

Interview Session Two: November 14, 2018 (listen/read)

 

Chapter 00B: 
Interview Identifier (listen/read)

 


Chapter 08  (Overview)
On Growing as a Leader, First Impressions of MD Anderson, and a First Day on the Job   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • Professional Values, Ethics, Purpose
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • Personal Background
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Growth and/or Change
  • Institutional Mission and Values
  • MD Anderson Culture

Dr. DuBois begins this chapter with a few additional comments about his decision to leave his position at Vanderbilt University and take on the role of Provost at MD Anderson.

Next he reflects on how the role of Provost allowed him to “up his game” as a leader and notes how the sheer size of the institution as well as the varied research interests of faculty presented a challenge. He also notes that his own experience with high-impact publishing allowed him gave him insight into the research environment.

Next, Dr. DuBois explains that on coming to MD Anderson he saw how dedicated employees were to their jobs and to patient-centered care. HIPAA – he also explains his personal connection with the institution through an aunt who was diagnosed with breast cancer and whose quality of life was greatly improved with MD Anderson treatment.

Dr. DuBois then explains how a family emergency interrupted his first day on the job.

 



Chapter 09  (Building the Institution)
Building Research from the Provost’s Office   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Research
  • Institutional Processes
  • Overview
  • Definitions, Explanations, Translations
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • Working Environment
  • Mentoring
  • On Mentoring

In this chapter, Dr. DuBois summarizes several of his first activities as Provost. He notes that he set up with staff then talks about how he addressed some issues in leadership of the UT Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. He explains why he undertook to increase the amount of faculty salaries covered by grants. He then discusses how he improved reduced the time needed for IRB approval of research protocols, hiring a process engineer to evaluate the process and reduce the number of days from 250 to 80/90.

Next he talks about initiatives for faculty support. First he discusses the importance of Dr. Elizabeth Travis’ [oral history interview] role in identifying women and diversity candidates for awards. Next, he explains why he wanted to develop a mentoring plan. Next he discusses some attempts to address physician burnout and also mentions some of the Medical University of South Carolina’s programs.

 



Chapter 10  (Building the Institution)
Strategic Planning, Budgets, Physical Space, and Industry Partnerships   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Research
  • Institutional Processes
  • Overview
  • Definitions, Explanations, Translations
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • Working Environment
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • The Institution and Finances
  • Industry Partnerships
  • Controversy
  • MD Anderson and Government
  • On Texas and Texans
  • MD Anderson Product Development and IP

In this chapter, Dr. DuBois summarizes several areas of activity with broad institutional impact. First he talks about the members of the Executive Committee who met with John Mendelsohn every week and describes the strategic plan that committee had worked out prior to his arrival.

Next he talks about the committee’s relationship with the Board of Visitors in addressing the “assumptions we are making about the future of the institution.” As an example he notes Dr. Thomas Burke’s role managing the clinical burden and the $250 million margin that created –a low margin in context of other businesses.

Dr. DuBois next notes that he was surprised at the degree to which the institution’s financial team wanted to ensure a return on any investment. He gives an example of the improvements that Dr. Ronald DePinho proposed to make on South Campus to foster research, and also talks about the Proton Therapy Center and the Center for Biomedical Imaging. He mentions a discussion of indoor walkways to connect the south and north campuses, which leads to a discussion of the importance of designing physical space.

Next, Dr. DuBois speaks about efforts to build partnerships with industry, also explaining how Texas laws about intellectual property hamper development of these collaborations.

 



Chapter 11  (Professional Path)
Financial Processes, Challenges, and a Crisis   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Institutional Processes
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • The Institution and Finances
  • Professional Practice
  • The Professional at Work
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • Working Environment
  • Personal Background

In this chapter, Dr. DuBois focuses on financial matters. He notes that as Provost he was required to manage a much larger budget than he had in previous roles. He also explains that Leon Leach [oral history interview], hired by John Mendelsohn, brought a heightened awareness of finances to the institution.

He next focuses on the economic downturn of 2008/2009, which required the institution to cut costs dramatically and reduce the workforce by 500. He explains how the Executive Committee worked to anticipate how to weather this challenge and talks about the parameters they used to identify employees to cut. He talks about the stresses of executive leadership.

Next, Dr. DuBois talks about building the Division of Academic Affairs. He notes that CPRIT funds were key for this growth and discusses working with CPRIT leadership to keep the MD Anderson community informed of their grant application processes. He talks about the connection between Academic Affairs and the research institutes and how key the former was in recruiting faculty for the institutes.

Next, Dr. DuBois discusses issues related to the faculty. He talks about the “Wall of Science and Medicine” he created to bring awareness to the faculty’s high profile publications and to stimulate pride and competition among the faculty. He then covers work with the Faculty Senate and the themes of concern.

Next, Dr. DuBois talks about the problem of rewarding investigators for their team science efforts, then notes that the Provost’s Office was able to set a good tenure process in place.

 



Chapter 12  (Building the Institution)
Executive Teamwork and a Long-Range Vision for the Institution   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • Collaborations
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • Institutional Mission and Values
  • The MD Anderson Brand, Reputation
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • The Institution and Finances
  • Professional Values, Ethics, Purpose
  • Ethics

Dr. DuBois begins this session by observing that the evolution of his leadership at MD Anderson was tied to the close working relationship of the executive team, who may have had differences at times, but who all agreed on where the institution should be headed. As an example, Dr. DuBois talks about the economic crisis of 2008/09. He talks about the very rapid and measured response of the executive team and the success of averting a serious institutional crisis. In addition to the reduction in workforce, Dr. DuBois notes that clinicians were asked to see one additional patient per session. He explains that there was general agreement that the long-term vision of the institution focused on keeping patient care first and talks about what is involved in keeping the institution abreast of the highest standards of care, including recruiting the best faculty.
 



Chapter 13  (Professional Path)
A Candidate for the Presidency of MD Anderson   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • Personal Background
  • Overview
  • Institutional Processes
  • MD Anderson and Government
  • Professional Path
  • Evolution of Career
  • Personal Background
  • Finance, Entrepreneur, Biotechnology
  • Career and Accomplishments
  • Overview
  • Definitions, Explanations, Translations
  • Dedication to MD Anderson, to Patients, to Faculty/Staff

In this chapter, Dr. DuBois talks about undertaking the process of applying to be MD Anderson’s fourth president. In response to the interviewer’s observation that many people in the institution felt he was viewed as Dr. John Mendelsohn’s heir apparent, Dr. DuBois confirms that Dr. Mendelsohn raised the issue of his retirement from the presidency during their first recruiting conversations. He felt he was “groomed for the role.” He then describes the search process and the steps he underwent to apply and interview for the position of president. He notes that he had a lot of support within the institution, but that the Board of Regents makes their own, independent choice, and internal candidates have challenges. (Dr. DuBois explains that he was really focused on the administration of the institution, on making incremental changes within the reality of the institution as opposed to bringing broad visions of institutional transformation, an allusion to the perspective brought by outside candidates. Dr. DuBois sketches the areas of growth he included in the vision he presented to the Board of Regents.

Dr. DuBois then talks about going through the final interview process and then getting the news that the Board had made another choice. He explains why he had wanted to job. He talks about his disappointment and initial feeling that he wanted to move on to another institution, but that people within MD Anderson asked him to stay on to help with the transition under Dr. Ronald DePinho.

 

 

Interview Session Three: November 15, 2018 (listen/read)

 

Chapter 00C: 
Interview Identifier (listen/read)



Chapter 14  (Building the Institution)
An Institution Transitions Under a New President   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • MD Anderson History
  • MD Anderson Snapshot
  • Critical Perspectives on MD Anderson
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Growth and/or Change
  • Obstacles, Challenges
  • Institutional Politics
  • Research
  • Portraits

Dr. DuBois begins this chapter by explaining how his role as Provost and Executive Vice President expanded his administrative experience.

Next he begins the narrative of the institution’s transition under fourth president, Ronald DePinho. He first provides his impressions of why the Board of Regents selected Dr. DePinho. A primary reason: to develop partnerships with industry that could add to the institution’s income stream and offset the ongoing financial stresses. This was a sound logic, in Dr. DuBois’ view.

He then explains how Dr. DePinho began to introduce his vision to MD Anderson, focusing on his team science model, his logic of the Moon Shots Program, and the reasoning behind selecting leukemia as a target disease.

Dr. DuBois then introduces some of the difficulties that began to arise in the early days of Dr. DePinho’s presidency as he began to take action to elevate the level of science at the institution. He talks about some communication issues, problems with leadership style and fit with MD Anderson culture.

 



Chapter 15  (Institutional Change)
Institutional Changes and the Decision to Leave MD Anderson   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • Critical Perspectives on MD Anderson
  • Building/Transforming the Institution
  • Multi-disciplinary Approaches
  • Growth and/or Change
  • Obstacles, Challenges
  • Institutional Politics
  • Controversy
  • The Business of MD Anderson
  • The Institution and Finances
  • MD Anderson History
  • MD Anderson Snapshot
  • Ethics
  • Research
  • Activities Outside Institution

In this chapter, Dr. DuBois identifies the institutional changes that prompted him to leave MD Anderson. He first notes that he tried to advise Dr. DePinho about problems emerging among the faculty. He observes that he had been approached by other institutions, but had wanted for professional and personal reasons to finish his career in Texas.

Dr. DuBois lists how he and Dr. DePinho differed in their view of leadership and administration. He notes changes in the leadership structure, and how the individuals from industry that Dr. DePinho had established on South Campus reported directly to Dr. DePinho and Dr. Lynda Chin, rather than following the usual communication chain through the EVPs. He observes how unusual it is to have both a president and his wife in prominent positions in the institution.

Dr. DuBois then discusses explains the controversies around the application that Dr. Lynda Chin made for CPRIT funds, skirting the usual process. Dr. DuBois explains why the application process existed and why not following it was such a problem. He explains the impact of the Chin/DePinho actions on the CPRIT process and MD Anderson.

Next, Dr. DuBois talks about changing attitudes among long-term employees and faculty as well as the Executive Committee as the DePinho presidency evolved. He also notes that in Dr. DePinho was not entirely to blame for the worsening situation at the institution, as he came into his role with no experience running a large, clinically-focused institution.

 



Chapter 16  (Overview)
New Roles at Arizona State University and the Medical University of South Carolina   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Character, Values, Beliefs, Talents
  • Personal Background
  • Professional Path
  • Evolution of Career
  • Inspirations to Practice Science/Medicine
  • Influences from People and Life Experiences
  • Activities Outside Institution
  • Career and Accomplishments
  • Professional Practice
  • The Professional at Work
  • Professional Values, Ethics, Purpose

In this chapter, Dr. DuBois talks about the roles he took on after leaving MD Anderson, first discussing his work as Executive Director of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University (December 2012-Feb 2016).4 He describes the change it made after MD Anderson, the scope of his work linking the physical and biomedical sciences and developing collaborations with clinicians. He explains why he enjoyed the job (and why it was, effectively, a 4-year sabbatical), as well as why he needed to leave that role.

Next he talks about why he accepted the role of Dean of the College of Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina. He talks about the administrative challenges, his vision and successes.

 



Chapter 17  (The Researcher)
Advances in Cancer Interruption   (listen/read)

Codes

  • The Researcher
  • Overview
  • Definitions, Explanations, Translations
  • Research
  • Prevention

In this chapter, Dr. DuBois talks about the latest evolution of his research into cancer interruption. He begins by talking about the process of moving his laboratory from MD Anderson to Arizona, then his rationale of looking at targets of research opportunity in pre-malignant disease. He reviews his previous work on COX-2, then talks about his current work, which uses the approach to target processes around pre-malignant lesions, “making prevention molecular.” Dr. DuBois gives some examples and discusses the implications of this approach for prevention.
 



Chapter 18  (Overview)
Final Comments on Leadership and Retirement   (listen/read)

Codes

  • Leadership
  • On Leadership
  • On the Nature of Institutions
  • Institutional Processes
  • MD Anderson Culture
  • Working Environment
  • Institutional Mission and Values

In this chapter, Dr. DuBois shares general views of leadership. He notes that, in his view, a seven to ten year tenure is sufficient and he envisions himself working for a foundation or as a chief scientific officer after he reaches that limit. He offers his advice to individuals who aspire to executive leadership, again stressing the need for physician leaders to train for administration and in finance.

Next, Dr. DuBois underscores the need to develop a pipeline of leaders in healthcare who have emotional intelligence and can truly lead. He notes that the traditional criteria of research success is not sufficient for picking leaders for institutions today. He uses the example of the Mayo Clinic to demonstrate a very effective institution culture that builds good internal leadership.

Next he makes final observations on his own experience of executive leadership at MD Anderson, including his hope of becoming president.